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Still 1961 with a Curtiss C-46 (SE-CFA) of TSA - Transair Sweden on the apron of Bulltofta Airport in Malmö. This was Transair's first C-46 acquired in 1957. Nearly a dozen C-46s passed through the hands of Transair until the last was disposed of in 1967. The livery was dark red.

(Photo: BL)

Two websites devoted to Transair Sweden are Tony Edlind's Aviation, Airliners, Airlines of Scandinavia Encyclopedia - Transair Sweden AB and Lasse Holst's Transair Sweden AB 1951-1981.

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Same place a year later. Another Transair aircraft, this time ex-SAS DC-6 SE-BDM, with Transair between 1960 and 1965, is made ready for yet another charter flight, bringing sun-seeking Scandinavians to Mediterranean beaches. Transair used 20+ DC-6s, DC-6Bs and DC-7Bs during the 1960s. It was a DC-6B of Transair which crashed at N'dola, in present-day Zambia, then Northern Rhodesia, killing all on board including U.N. Secretary General Hammarskjöld. This was in September 1961 in the midst of the Congo crisis. A good deal of Transair's fleet was at one time or another under charter to the United Nations.

(Photo: BL)

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Back to 1961, though we are still at Bulltofta. Here is a fairly rare airliner, even for the day (except maybe to the people of Britain). It is a Handley Page Hermes 4, unfortunately parked at some distance and without a telephoto lens, the photographer did his best. This aircraft, G-ALDU, was purchased from BOAC in 1956 by the British independent Britavia. Later, it was transferred to Silver City Airways, another airline within the British Aviation Services group. This airline was mostly known for its cross-Channel car ferry services. I have but on one other occasion seen a Hermes at Bulltofta. One afternoon in 1961, Air Safaris, primarily a charter airline, brought both a Hermes and a Vickers Viking to the airport. The load: a British football (soccer) team and its fans.

(Photo: Magnus Larsson)

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By 1961 Malmö had become a hub for Scandinavian IT operations to the south of Europe and the Canary Islands. Danish, Norwegian and Finnish airliners were frequent visitors. Most of them were DC-6s and DC-6Bs. Above is seen one of the more fascinating airliners, a Canadair C-4, also known as the Argonaut, its class name when with the British BOAC. The C-4 was a DC-4, licence-built by Canadair, with Rolls-Royce Merlin engines and a pressurized cabin. In Scandinavia it was seen in the colours of the Danish airline Flying Enterprise, which started in 1960 with a fleet of ex-BOAC aircraft. Although not a perfect shot of the plane, this photo brings a nice atmosphere of bygone days, with the out-door café and viewing-ground by the apron. Look at all those hats! You certainly feel a little nostalgic!

(Photo: BL)

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Flying Enterprise again, now in the summer of 1964. In the meantime the airline had upgraded to DC-7s, one of which (OY-DMP) is seen at Copenhagen's Kastrup Airport. The airline turned into Conair in late 1964, which eventually, some 30 years later, merged with Scanair, the former SAS subsidiary, to become Premiair (renamed MyTravel Airways in 2002 and Thomas Cook Airlines Scandinavia in 2008).

(Photo: BL)

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Colour photos

 

This page last updated March 28, 2010.